Recently Overheard at Casa Rabbit

TR (speaking to12-year-old child who is about to leave for school): Tigger, WHY are you wearing pajama pants?
Tigger: It’s “dress like an emo” day.
TR: Emos wear pajama pants?
Tigger: They’re Hello Kitty pajama pants!

(Child leaves, door slams)

TR: …???


TR (speaking to 9-year-old child furiously scribbling numbers and variables): Little Bit, time to go to bed.
LB: Mommm, can I please do one more simultaneous equation problem first?
TR: You need your sleep.  You can do more math tomorrow!


TR: Should we have pumpkin pie or pumpkin cheesecake on Thanksgiving?
LB: Well, we always have pumpkin pie, so this time I think maybe we should have pumpkin cheesecake.

TR: Should we have pumpkin pie or pumpkin cheesecake on Thanksgiving?
Tigger: Cheesecake!

TR:  Both girls said cheesecake.  The die is cast.
TechnoGeek: Ok, just watch out crossing those rivers.
TR: …???

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13 thoughts on “Recently Overheard at Casa Rabbit

  1. Why is your family mystifying you these days? Cryptic indeed. I get occasional lessons from girls at church or my next door neighbor girls about emo but I am still kind of in the dark (ha ha! or maybe not, because if emo involves Hello Kitty I really don’t get it – I thought it was more an Evanescence thing?) about it as a social movement.Ooh, can I have some pumpkin cheesecake?

  2. I see no mention of Hello Kitty in the Emo style guide, but what do I know – I never heard of Emo until 5 minutes ago.Crossing rivers?  Perhaps he thought you were talking about casting lines and not dies?  Maybe fish like pumpkin?  It is entirely too early in the day to be contemplating such weighty subjects.

  3. Suetonius reports that Julius Caesar, after crossing the Rubicon in defiance of the senate’s orders, said “Alea iacta est”. It is usually translated as “The die is cast”, but accounts vary. For example some record it as “Jacta alea esto” or “The dice have been cast”. Some linguists suggest that the word “alea” refers to the form of backgammon popular in the day, and a better translation might be “Let the game begin” or “The game has begun.”In any case, Julius was a showman and this proclamation was typical of his dramatic and poetic gestures. His own accounts of his campaigns are quite compelling and an enjoyable read. Suetonius is rather drier, but still captures much of the drama of Caesar’s remarkable  career.

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